Book: Life@Work (Marketplace Success for People of Faith) by John C. Maxwell

Authors John C. Maxwell, Stephen Graves, and Thomas Addington identify the basic tools followers of Jesus should always have in their work toolbox: Calling, Serving, Character, and Skill.

The conventional wisdom of leadership sees character as a muscle of leadership. In truth, character is a muscle of the heart. Our culture is enamored with leadership when it should be enamored with character.

The lines of our behavior draw picture of our character. Behavior and character are related, but they’re not the same. Behavior is what we do. Character is the person our behavior has made us into. Behavior is just one action. Any behavior, duplicated and reduplicated, forms a part of our character. Character is a fruit of the heart.

If characters is what counts most, then it is critical that we build and protect a strong pure heart. As the book of Proverbs says “as the heart goes, so we go.” The heart is where character is forged. After God gives us a new heart, it is up to us to water and nurture it.

This book helps readers learn how to better integrate faith and work and why it is crucial that we do so.

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Movie: God’s Not Dead

God's Not DeadIn God’s Not Dead, college freshman and devout Christian Josh Wheaton (Shane Harper) finds his faith challenged on his first day of Philosophy class by the dogmatic and argumentative Professor Radisson (Kevin Sorbo). Radisson begins class by informing students that they will need to disavow, in writing, the existence of God on that first day, or face a failing grade. As other students in the class begin scribbling the words “God Is Dead” on pieces of paper as instructed, Josh find himself at a crossroads, having to choose between his faith and his future.

Josh offers a nervous refusal, provoking an irate reaction from his smug professor. Radisson assigns him a daunting task: if Josh will not admit that “God Is Dead,” he must prove God’s existence by presenting well-researched, intellectual arguments and evidence over the course of the semester, and engage Radisson in a head-to-head debate in front of the class.

If Josh fails to convince his classmates of God’s existence, he will fail the course and hinder his lofty academic goals. With almost no one in his corner, Josh wonders if he can really fight for what he believes. Can he actually prove the existence of God? Wouldn’t it just be easier just to write “God Is Dead” and put the whole incident behind him?

God’s Not Dead weaves together multiple stories of faith, doubt and disbelief, culminating in a dramatic call to action. What would you do if someone in a position of authority and influence in your life demanded that you renounce your faith? That’s the central question God’s Not Dead forces viewers to grapple with. And Josh Wheaton’s answer is to refuse. And then to explain exactly why he’s refusing. Would you be able to do the same?

[Dove approved (12+). Rated PG. Approx. 95 minutes.]

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